Rye Brook Mother Brings Volunteer Spirit To Rotary President Position

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Joe and Roz Carvin have two children and live in Rye Brook.
Joe and Roz Carvin have two children and live in Rye Brook. Photo Credit: Brian Donnelly
Roz Carvin was a lawyer in London, and is now a stay-at-home mom.
Roz Carvin was a lawyer in London, and is now a stay-at-home mom. Photo Credit: Brian Donnelly

RYE BROOK, N.Y. – Rozlyn Carvin never intended to serve as president of the Port Chester-Rye Brook Rotary, but she will answer the club’s call of “service above self” when she is installed as president on June 24 at Marianacci's restaurant in Port Chester.

Carvin, whose husband, Joe, is the Rye Town supervisor, has volunteered for the Rotary for the last four years. She has lived in Rye Brook since 2002 after living in London, where she was a barrister (lawyer). She is now a stay-at-home mom with two children.

“There’s always some group of people who need help. That really speaks to me and so Rotary has been a great opportunity for me to fulfill that side of myself,” she said.

The organization’s main program is called Food 2 Grow On and it provides supplemental lunch-time food for children identified as “food insecure.”

“Their main meal is school lunch and so Saturday and Sunday they eat very little or not at all,” she said. The program sends a package of food stuffs home to the children on a Friday afternoon to supplement their weekend meals.

Carvin would like to expand Rotary’s efforts as president and said she will look for areas where there is a need, especially involving children. She said she would like to find a way to have Rotary work together with the charity she started with her husband in 2006, One World, United and Virtuous, which won Rotary’s peace award last year.

“We provide character education with the global perspective to small children from fourth grade to high school level,” she said.

The organization connects area students with children around the U.S. and the world, and they do service projects each year. The Port Chester club raised money this year to send 150 mosquito nets to different parts of Africa with the help of an organization called Nothing But Net, which matched the money raised by the kids to send a total of 300 nets, which protect kids against malaria.

“It makes young people realize that they can make a difference, they can help somebody else, whether it’s here at home or overseas,” Carvin said, adding that they hope to expand the program to colleges soon. 

Carvin also works with SPRYE, which helps seniors age in place. 

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